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(+44) 020 7483 0120 | info@ccst.co.uk
Healing physical and emotional pain, chronic illness, trauma, and the stresses of life.

Dentistry and the Cranio-Sacral System
(with Dr. Granville Langly-Smith)

Saturday/Sunday 1st/2nd February 2020
£240 (£270)

Can you identify primary dental sources of ill health?
Can you distinguish dental and non-dental sources of disturbance?
Do your patients really need the orthodontic treatment recommended by their dentist?
Can you help to resolve TMJ syndrome and other persistent tooth and jaw pains?
Can you trace obscure symptoms of chronic fatigue and debilitation to their dental source?

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Granville Langly-Smith is one of those few Orthodontists who, not only understands the cranio-sacral system, but uses it himself as a matter of course with his dental and orthodontic patients. He has practised as a Dentist and Orthodontist for 30 years, integrating an understanding of whole-body mechanics and Cranio-Sacral Therapy into his practice. He runs a specialist orthodontic practice with treatment based on the whole-body approach.

In this course, he will demonstrate how dental malocclusions and crooked teeth can be manifestations of cranial and body distortions, and how orthodontics integrated with cranio-sacral work can produce outstanding results in patients. With the help of slides from his vast library of case histories, he will explain the various dental approaches and describe the progress of various cases. He will demonstrate the benefits of a better understanding of cranio-sacral dental relationships, and the value of referral both ways.

This will be a practical seminar, open to Dentists, Cranial Osteopaths and Cranio-Sacral Therapists, enabling an inspiring and informative interaction.

“Cranio-sacral therapy combined with good dentistry can be nothing less than awesome!”
Dr Dietricht Klinghardt

Booking and further information:

To book a place, please complete the online application form and send payment, or for further information please contact info@ccst.co.uk
or 020 7483 0120

Before
Before

Dr Granville Langly Smith:

I travelled extensively in my early days after qualifying as a dentist and it was only after I settled down and had a family that I developed a stable practice and started to really get to know my patients. I started to see recurring symptoms in some people, who exhibited clicking jaw joints, head, neck and back pain, and many other symptoms. I just knew that I had a responsibility to try and help these patients. It was the start of my quest over almost a forty year period to look for answers.

It soon became apparent to me that all these often complex problems could not be solved by dentistry alone. I started working with chiropractors and osteopaths and then studied cranio-sacral therapy to see how everything interrelated.

Dentists and cranio-sacral therapists who help patients with craniomandibular disorders often find that these patients have a long and often desperate history of pain and ever increasing misery.

 

Dr Dietricht Klinghardt MD. PhD. is a remarkable, innovative doctor, who was awarded the physician of the year both in 2007 and 2011 from ‘The global foundation of integrative medicine’ and ‘The International academy of biological dentistry and medicine’ respectively. As a patient once remarked “There are doctors, and there are healers, and then there is Dietricht!”

I was chatting to Dietricht one day about the merits of cranio-sacral therapy. He turned to me and said “Cranio-sacral therapy is excellent. However, you are also an orthodontist, and cranio-sacral therapy combined with good dentistry can be nothing less than awesome!”

 

My personal experience of using cranio-sacral therapy with my orthodontic work has been simply amazing. The treatment seems to flow effortlessly, compared to how I used to work earlier in my career. Even the most challenging cases seem to unwind back towards nature’s design. Children develop beautiful broad smiles on balanced postures and go out into the world healthy and confident.

I believe that both dentists and cranio-sacral therapists have the power to do so much good - but ignorance of the interconnectedness of these two disciplines can cause problems.

Dr Granville Langly Smith

 

After
After
Before
Before
After
After

 

I have had the great pleasure and privilege to have met and been taught by some very fine and forward thinking clinicians. The grandfather of these researchers and the man who recognized ‘Dental Distress’ was Dr Aelred Fonder.

After the second world war, Dr Fonder worked as a general dentist in a small town in Illinois, USA. He was a meticulous practitioner and did beautiful work reconstructing patients’ occlusions, trying to save their teeth wherever possible.

Patients who had had their bites reconstructed started to comment at their follow-up appointments as to how they were experiencing improvements in their health, which seemed to coincide with their improved dental situation. At first, Dr Fonder just thought it was coincidence and put it down to the placebo effect from his ‘excellent care’. However, as time went by, he examined his patients’ records and a pattern emerged that could not be ignored. It seemed that an improvement in a patient’s bite really did improve the patient’s health. Their postures improved, skin rashes disappeared, headaches disappeared and ear problems and gynaecological problems all improved, as well as many other disorders.

Dr Fonder teamed up with Dr Hans Selye, who is now renowned as the world expert on stress. Dr Selye concluded that the body’s adaptive mechanism can only cope so far when under prolonged stress, and that its ability to compensate eventually breaks down and homeostasis is threatened. Disease processes take over as the immune system is weakened and adrenaline and cortisol flood the blood stream. Dr Fonder and Dr Selye, with their research, concluded that imbalanced jaw relationships, poor vertical support and malocclusion of the teeth were a persistent source of stress on the body. They named these sources of stress as ‘The Dental Distress Syndrome’.

It has been my experience that treating these patients over many years has been a fascinating and most rewarding experience. It changes people’s lives for the better and in many cases actually gives them their lives back. I believe that Dr Fonder was correct in his ‘Dental Distress’ diagnosis. However, I believe that he was unaware that he was actually benefitting the cranio-sacral system. Even today, it is only a small proportion of dentists who know about cranio-sacral therapy and the involuntary respiratory mechanism. This is why teaching and spreading the word is so important, as both dentists and cranio-sacral therapists are in a position to do so much good and to help a great number of people.

Dr Granville Langly Smith

 

Dentistry and cranio-sacral therapy can play a massive role in working together. No one person can treat everything, but by forming a team - especially in the treatment of young children who have malocclusions with a compromised cranial system and other such debilitating situations - dentists and cranio-sacral therapists, working cooperatively, can have remarkable results in helping those children (and adults) to develop normally and healthily into nature’s design.

Dr Granville Langly Smith

 

Before
Before
After
After

Dr Wojciech Tarnowski:

Working in general dental practice every day was not conducive to practising cranial osteopathy, but I decided to tune in to every single dental patient every time through the mandible. For a long time nothing happened, except that patients commented how relaxed and cared for they felt having their face held. Then one day I could instantly tune in to the cranial rhythm and assess its quality. This enabled me to monitor the effect that common dental procedures had on the cranial mechanism. I was appalled by what I discovered.

For example, once, it was necessary to remove a misplaced upper wisdom tooth which was causing lacerations to the cheek. With local anaesthetic, the extraction was very quick and painless but on checking the cranial system, I found that it was in a profound state of shock. It took a good few minutes to dissipate the shock and re-establish the rhythm.

After this, I monitored all dental procedures and attempted to dissipate the aftershock. I soon realised that, with cranial treatment, traumas healed up much more quickly, and with no post-operative complications. This also applied to infections and inflammations and even pericoronitis.

Without doubt, it is very valuable for a patient to receive good quality Cranio-Sacral Therapy before dentistry, in order to eliminate their Ascending Patterns and free up their cranial sutures.

Any dentistry and orthodontics will affect the Descending Patterns and challenge any Ascending Patterns to react. Without Cranio-Sacral Therapy, instead of the body adapting smoothly to change, the system could lock up, not only precipitating pain, but interfering with the dentistry and slowing down orthodontic treatment. When working smoothly, following appropriate cranio sacral therapy, the body will adapt and remain in dynamic equilibrium, and use energy efficiently. This can help to minimise any adverse effects of dentistry.

Dr Wojciech Tarnowski

 

Some therapies are more effective than others. Cranio-Sacral Therapy, with a little help from appropriate dentistry and an awareness of how the vestibular system works has the potential for being the most effective holistic therapy of all by restoring homeostasis.

Dr Wojciech Tarnowski

 

“Cranio-sacral therapy combined with good dentistry can be nothing less than awesome!”

Dr Dietricht Klinghardt

Engaging with the 

Medial Pterygoids
Engaging with the Medial Pterygoids
Integrating the Alveolar ridges of the Maxillae
Integrating the Alveolar ridges of the Maxillae

Thomas Attlee:

The combination of whole-person dentistry and cranio-sacral integration working together can be profoundly transformative.

 

Margaret suffered persistent pain in her jaw and in several teeth, often accompanied by severe headaches. Years of extensive dentistry had not helped. Her orthodontist wanted to embark on a comprehensive programme to restructure her jaw. Hoping to find an easier solution, Margaret tried cranio-sacral integration. Her symptoms were relieved very quickly and never recurred. The source of the condition was not in the teeth or jaw at all.

 

In everyday cranio-sacral practice, one encounters many patients with a variety of issues involving the teeth and jaw – persistent tooth pain, temporo-mandibular joint disturbances, facial pain - that have not been resolved through conventional dentistry.

It is also common to encounter patients with concerns as to whether the major dentistry or orthodontic treatment that has been recommended to them is appropriate or necessary. In order to establish an appropriate response to these circumstances which will be of greatest benefit to the patient, we need a thorough understanding of the often complex interactions that may be involved.

Local symptoms in the teeth, jaw, or temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ) may often arise from sources elsewhere in the body, and yet are generally (and understandably) treated as local disturbances - as a result of which a great deal of unnecessary and inappropriate dentistry and orthodontics may be carried out – while the true source of the symptoms remains unidentified.

Conversely, disturbances to the teeth, jaw, or temporo-mandibular joints can have profound debilitating effects on the whole body and on general health. Often there may be no local symptoms in the teeth and jaw, rendering the source of the disturbance potentially difficult to trace - as a result of which such cases are often not recognized.

For effective health care, it is essential for the practitioner - dental practitioner, cranio-sacral therapist or any other practitioner - to acknowledge this two-way interaction and to develop the necessary skills to evaluate whether the situation will be most effectively addressed through dentistry, cranio-sacral therapy, or a combination of the two, and perhaps other therapies also

 

 

“As dentists we are taught to analyse body systems and body parts separately. We are taught to change one area at a time, but such approaches frequently ignore the interconnectedness of the systems in the human body”

Dr John Laughlin (Holistic Dentist)

“Dental therapies for the most part fail to take into consideration areas of the body beyond dentition, the status of the maxillae and mandible, and their occlusion”

Dr John Laughlin (Holistic Dentist)

 

“Dental procedures can potentially have debilitating, possibly-long term effects on a person’s health, when those procedures interfere with the optimal functioning of the cranial complex”

Dr John Laughlin (Holistic Dentist)

 

Maxillary Integration
Maxillary Integration
Premaxila and Upper Incisors
Premaxila and Upper Incisors
Individual tooth contact
Individual tooth contact

Interconnected:

The teeth and jaw are an integral part of the rest of the body. If they are treated in isolation, without awareness of that interconnection, then the benefits may be limited, and the effects potentially disruptive.

An uneven bite or malocclusion may lead to unbalanced muscle use - jaw muscles, throat muscles, neck muscles - with domino effects through the body. The malocclusion could, for example, result in tightness of the sterno-cleido-mastoid muscle on one side, leading to asymmetry of the head and neck, restriction of the temporal bone on the affected side, compression of the jugular foramen, impinging on the jugular vein, the spinal-accessory nerve and the vagus nerve, causing headaches, ear pain, tinnitus, respiratory, cardiac and digestive disturbances, neck and back pain, mental disorientation and a multitude of other possible symptoms.

Similarly, an imbalance anywhere in the body could result in unbalanced muscular pulls, leading to asymmetrical contraction of the sterno-cleido-mastoid muscle, leading to temporal bone restriction, mandibular imbalance, TMJ dysfunction, and an uneven bite, resulting in toothache, jaw pain, TMJ pain, clicking jaw, earache, tinnitus and a multitude of other symptoms.

 

Whole person perspective:

Ideally, dentistry is most effectively approached from a whole-person perspective, so that every patient can be evaluated within that whole-person understanding, and their situation can be addressed accordingly, with accurate identification of the underlying source, minimal extractions and surgery, and a more balanced, integrated and healthy resolution.

Unfortunately, despite the many excellent dentists in conventional practice, there are as yet very few dentists practising whole-person dentistry - incorporating an awareness of whole-body patterns, posture, nutrition, cranial restrictions, cranio-sacral mobility, and the inevitable interaction and interconnectedness of the teeth and jaw within the rest of body

 

Descending patterns:

Disturbances arising within the teeth and jaw as the primary source, but affecting other parts of the body or affecting overall health are described as descending patterns.  Symptoms may include headaches, skin rashes, earaches, gynaecological problems, asthma, eczema, postural collapse, disturbed motor function, reduced academic ability, irritability, neck pain, vertigo, hearing disturbances, and chronic fatigue.

Descending patterns tend to remain unrecognized and misdiagnosed, partly because patients do not generally go to a dentist if their symptoms are not dental, and partly because most doctors, dentists and therapists are unaware of this possibility, and are therefore unlikely to identify the primary dental source when the symptoms do not involve the teeth and jaw.

There are many examples of transformations in function brought about through a whole-person dental approach which successfully identifies general health issues as having a source in the teeth and jaw, including reduced ADHD symptoms, improved social skills, ease of breathing, elimination of bedwetting, enhanced ease of learning, marked improvements in academic learning, increased self esteem, and increased energy.

There is a very small number of dentists working with a whole-person perspective who might recognize these patterns, and a small number of cranial practitioners who have the necessary information to identify such situations correctly.

 

               “TMJ syndrome is usually a symptom not a cause. 90% of cases are not primary temporo-mandibular joint disturbances. They are usually a result of  cranio-sacral system dysfunction."                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Dr John Upledger

 

Cranio-sacral integration - which includes addressing stress factors, resolving structural imbalances and enhancing underlying health - can eliminate the need for much dentistry and orthodontics. But as cranio-sacral therapists, we also need to acknowledge and recognize primary dental issues, and we need to be able to distinguish dental sources and non-dental sources.

 

  “Many orthodontists believe that if the teeth are crowded, then the only thing to do is to remove them (usually the bicuspids). Such removal leads to elimination of the normal forces on the jaw. The underlying forces (tight muscles and fascia etc) which have created the disturbance in the first place are not addressed and continue to have their detrimental effect.”

Dr John Laughlin (Holistic Dentist)

 

“Removing teeth produces neuro-muscular imbalance, not only around the mouth and face, but consequently through the head, neck and whole body, with potential widespread disturbances such as back pain, as well as compression of the occipito-mastoid suture, jugular foramen, and vagus nerve, with all their potential consequences on the heart, lungs and digestive system”.

Dr John Laughlin (Holistic Dentist)

 

Integration of dentistry with cranio-sacral therapy

In treating patients with dental or jaw related health issues, the most effective results are generally obtained through an intelligent and cooperative combination of cranio-sacral integration and whole-person dentistry.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Thomas Attlee

“Dental therapy that considers the whole body can result in major benefits, especially when integrated with suitable cranial therapy”

Dr John Laughlin (Holistic Dentist)

 

Ideally, every dental patient would be assessed from a whole-person perspective, whether by an appropriately trained whole-person dentist or an appropriately trained cranio-sacral therapist, in order to identify whether their dental symptoms are primary dental disturbances or secondary to other sources.

 

“In a perfect world, all dentists would be fully trained cranio-sacral healers and test their patients’ cranial mechanics before and after every dental procedure.”

                                                                                                                                                                            Hugh Milne

Treating a traumatised tooth
Treating a traumatised tooth
Treating an Individual tooth in the Mandible
Treating an Individual tooth in the Mandible

Cooperation between dentistry and cranio-sacral integration, along with whole-person awareness, is likely to enable the best outcome for patients, and would ideally proceed through the following course of events:

- identify the primary source accurately (thereby avoiding unnecessary and inappropriate treatment, whether dental or cranio-sacral)

- cranio-sacral integration to bring the system as a whole (physical and psycho-emotional) into balance. This may be enough to resolve the issue, or it can lay the foundation for the dental work by establishing the most conducive circumstances for dental treatment

- utilise dentistry and orthodontics where appropriate to address any primary dental disturbances

- maintain regular cranio-sacral integration throughout any dental work in order to help the body to adapt to and integrate the dental changes as they occur

- cranio-sacral integration to re-integrate the system around any dental work that has been carried out

 

 

It would be beneficial to the health of the community in general, if all dentists had some understanding of the principles of whole-person dentistry and of cranial work, so that they can:

- be aware that dental issues can arise from elsewhere in the body

- refer patients for whole-person dentistry where necessary

- be aware that dental issues can arise as a result of cranial restrictions, cranio-sacral imbalances and whole-person imbalances

- recognize the value of integrating cranio-sacral therapy with dentistry in order to enable more effective outcomes

- refer patients for cranio-sacral integration before, during, and after dentistry

- recognise the significance of stress factors in many dental, jaw and temporo-mandibular joint conditions and refer accordingly

- avoid unnecessary and irrelevant dental work, especially in the field of TMJ syndrome

 

 

As dentist John Laughlin concludes:

“Cranial therapy is beneficial for all dental patients, and should be included in most if not all dental regimens. The body needs to be viewed as an entire structure and the dental professional (dentist, orthodontist, or oral surgeon) must be encouraged to understand and consider this interrelatedness.”

 

 

Common scenarios:

In cranio-sacral practice, various scenarios relating to dental issues commonly arise:

- patients with dental or temporo-mandibular joint symptoms

- patients asking whether they should undergo extensive dental or orthodontic treatment that has been recommended

- parents asking whether their children should undergo extensive dental or orthodontic treatment that has been recommended

- patients with multiple non-dental symptoms, or recurrent symptoms, or who are not responding consistently to cranio-sacral treatment

All of these scenarios can be effectively addressed through an appropriate informed approach.

 

 

Caroline had suffered persistent TMJ pain for years. It was mildly painful all the time, always painful when she chewed, and would often spread through the right side of her face and head. Two of her teeth, one on the left side and one on the right side were also persistently painful. She also tended to grind her teeth.

 

She had been receiving regular dental treatment for over three years to try and resolve the symptoms, but without success. Her dentist has given her a bite plate which immediately threw her system into chaos with constant headaches, neck pain, mental confusion and emotional distress, and a locked up feeling. She stopped using it after a few days. Her dentist persuaded her to try it again at least part time, saying that she would need to put up with the symptoms for a while until her jaw and TMJ adjusted. But her symptoms were unbearable and she could not continue wearing it. Her dentist was also keen to embark on further substantial dental work to try and align her jaw, and retrain her jaw muscles.

 

Caroline’s case history was long and complex. Among the list of various injuries, her story revealed certain particularly significant points. She had been hit by a car 23 years previously and her left hip remained intermittently painful ever since. She had fallen on her right shoulder 12 years ago, and her neck and right shoulder were usually tight and painful, particularly when her hip was playing up. Her childhood had been stressful and she had learnt to be submissive, suppressing her feelings of anger and resentment in order to avoid trouble.

 

External observation of her face showed a well balanced appearance. Looking inside her mouth revealed two missing teeth, one on each side, but this was not affecting her bite significantly, and otherwise a well balanced set of teeth. The muscles around her jaw were tighter on the right hand side.

 

Cranio-sacral palpation revealed a very clear whole-body twist, passing up from her left hip through the right shoulder into the right TMJ, with a corresponding torsion in the cranium, where the temporal bones were struggling to maintain balance within this whole body twist, putting strain on her TMJ. The contraction in her right shoulder and neck was also pulling the right side of her head downwards, particularly affecting the temporal bone and TMJ. The suppressed anger was clearly palpable in the tight contracted quality of her system as a whole, and particularly in her solar plexus and heart centre.

 

She had brought her bite plate with her, even though she had not used it for a long time. We palpated her system with and without the bite plate in place, and her cranio-sacral system definitely did not like the bite plate, locking up immediately.

 

Addressing the hip injury and releasing the tension throughout her system reduced the whole body twist substantially. After her first treatment, she reported that she felt more comfortable and balanced throughout her body and that her TMJ pain had disappeared. Working with the childhood trauma enabled significant changes in the overall quality of her system, and significantly reduced her teeth grinding.

 

These patterns were however deeply ingrained from childhood and from long standing injuries, and regular consistent treatment was needed to maintain balance and integration. Initially the symptoms tended to creep back gradually. With each treatment, the improvement lasted longer, and she was soon spending most of her time feeing relatively comfortable. Circumstances prevented her from receiving as much treatment as she would have liked, so it was difficult to reach complete resolution.  At times of stress or overexertion, the symptoms would start to return, and she would come back for further treatment.

 

She did not need any further dentistry, because the source of her TMJ and tooth pain was not in the teeth or jaw. Initially, when her TMJ symptoms tended to recur, she wondered (understandably) if there was something fundamentally wrong with her jaw that needed dental or orthodontic treatment. But it was clear from the evidence of the cranio-sacral system that her TMJ symptoms were not coming from her jaw and that further dentistry was not necessary.

Forthcoming Courses 2017

  • Saturday 1st April 2017

    Introductory Day

  • Saturday 4th April 2017

    Introductory Course (London)

  • July 2018

    One Year Professional Training (Diploma Course)

  • October 2017 - July 2019

    One Year Professional Training (Diploma Course)

  • October 2017 - May 2018

    Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology - Foundation Course 

Forthcoming Courses 2017

  • Saturday 1st April 2017

    Introductory Day

  • Saturday 4th April 2017

    Introductory Course (London)

  • July 2018

    One Year Professional Training (Diploma Course)

  • October 2017 - July 2019

    One Year Professional Training (Diploma Course)

  • October 2017 - May 2018

    Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology - Foundation Course 

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